How I Teach

I have been drawn to working with primary school children since I was very young. I went to a Montessori Primary School where we were taught to count with horse chestnuts and in science we made bread. I was always a practical learner. I trained to become a Montessori Directress http://www.montessori-uk.org/ and have since worked within many different schools and with many different children. I am certified by the British Dyslexia Association to work with children with Dyslexia – literacy – and Dyscalculia – numeracyhttp://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/.


My entire focus is to help your child not to feel lost, frustrated, to support them so that they don't fall behind at school, so far behind that they have little chance of catching up. I like to look behind and beyond the difficulties, dismantling them and helping your child relearn in a way which will help the information to stay in their memory and be retrieved when it is needed.


My skills would also be supportive and helpful for any child feeling at a bit of a loss and struggling at school. I have always been drawn to children who did not find school work as easy and straight forward as others. I thrive on working out how to give these children the information necessary so that work and information can be absorbed, retained and available for another day. I struggled at school, as did my son. I know how it feels.


Our current school system has been handed down to us from the 1900’s. There have been many changes. Any of us can notice this when they see how information is given to our children now, compared to how we learnt at school. Information is much more flexible, it can be presented from so many different angles. Gone are the days of boring black and white text books. However, the pace of learning is increasing and with the ever present demand on performance and exams, it is difficult for everyone to always keep up. A child who has further problems, either diagnosed or suspected, struggles even more. They struggle with hand writing, of copying off the board, remembering instructions, times tables, spelling words or P.E. kit. I quite like the initial image which you can use, "Is your son or daughter performing and achieving to the level that you think they should?" If you feel that your child should really be doing better, then I can help.


Resolve to edge in a little reading every day, if it is but a single sentence. If you gain fifteen minutes a day, it will make itself felt at the end of the year.
— Christopher Morley (1890 - 1957)